Fighting flash fraud on Ebay

The authors of this blog want to elimnate flash fraud on Ebay

Archive for May 18th, 2009

Fake 64GB flash drive listed in ebay Australia.

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milany69 Ebay member milany69 (based in Australia) has listed this familiar fake64GB Kingston flash drive for sale. Anyone using one of these will eventually lose their files. If you bought one of these test immediately with h2testw and report in with your results.

Report in to SOSFakeFlash if your testing confirms you have a false capacity device.

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Written by fightflashfraud

May 18, 2009 at 7:05 PM

Fake 64GB flash drive on ebay France – beware users will lose files!

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nadin357

Seller nadin357 (based in France) is selling fake 64GB Kingston flash drives commonly seen on ebay. The seller has found that one doesn’t work but does not seem to know why and has listed it as faulty for a much cheaper price. We can tell nadin357 why it is not working – it is because the drives are fraudulently programmed to fake capacities and eventually all of them will be useless and users files will be lost or corrupted. If you bought one you should test immediately with h2testw.

Report in to SOSFakeFlash if your testing confirms you have a false capacity device.

UPDATE: 14/07/09
Seems that not a single buyer noticed they bought a fake from this seller – now the seller seems to be selling counterfeit Kinston DataTraveler 150 – a less obvious fake than the one above.

Written by fightflashfraud

May 18, 2009 at 2:32 PM

Another new Chinese fraudster selling flash drives on ebay?

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milliondog

Hong Kong seller milliondog looks a little suspect to fightflashfraud. This seller built up a feedback score since registering on ebay on March 17th 2009 by selling mobile phone screen protectors. I say “selling” but it looks a bit like at least the first 12 feedback comments were from IDs set up by the fraudsters themselves. All were recent, they all “bought” from the same items from the same few ids… alarm bells ring when we see things like this.

Fraudsters often start by selling something innocuous and start with false feedback left by their cronies before diving into fake flash sales. The positive feedback fools people into thinking the flash drives must be ok and protects their feedback going into minus numbers if someone does find them out. Is this the case with milliondog? Time will tell – and we are fairly sure what the story will be. We urge anyone who bought a flash drive from this seller to test with h2testw.

Report Report in to SOSFakeFlash if your testing confirms you have a false capacity device.

Written by fightflashfraud

May 18, 2009 at 10:22 AM