Fighting flash fraud on Ebay

The authors of this blog want to elimnate flash fraud on Ebay

Posts Tagged ‘faulty USB flash drive

If 128GB Kingston DT200 sold on ebay is genuine pakiz4u703 made a loss.

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If the 128GB Kingston DataTraveler 200 sold by pakiz4u703 is genuine then the seller made a loss by auctioning it on ebay. Buyers can check whether or not a Kingston flash drive is genuine quite easily – here are the steps:

  1. Look at the back of the pack – is there a serial number?
  2. If there is no serial number (there should be a label showing this) then it is sure to be a fake capacity counterfeit that corrupts files – but the presence of a serial number does not, in itself, gaurantee it is genuine.

  3. Look at the USB connector – is there engraving on it giving details about the flash drive?
  4. If there is no engraving you can be sure it is a counterfeit that will trash your files – but again, the presence of engraving does not in itself gaurantee it is genuine.

  5. If both a serial number and engraving are present try verifying the serial number with Kingston.
  6. If Kingston cannot verify the serial number then you have a fake capacity counterfeit and your data will become lost or corrupted after a while.

We advise everyone who buys flash memory items to test them with the free program h2testw irrespective of where they were purchased – otherwise you run the risk of data loss and corruption.

Report your fake if testing confirms you have purchased fake capacity flash memory on ebay.

USB flash drive from ebayer aran69 is not faulty but fake capacity

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This USB flash drive listed on ebay by aran69 is not (as the seller seems to think) faulty – it is a deliberately created fake capacity flash drive that corrupts files after a while. Do not buy so called faulty flash drives on ebay – they are fakes from China that will trash your data.

We advise everyone who buys flash memory items to test them with the free program h2testw irrespective of where they were purchased – otherwise you run the risk of data loss and corruption.

Report your fake if testing confirms you have purchased fake capacity flash memory on ebay.

This USB flash drive listed on ebay as faulty is not faulty but fake!

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A lot of ebay members worldwide are now listing “faulty” or “defective” flash drives for sale. They are usually not faulty or defective – they are deliberately created fake capacity flash drives. A fake capacity flash drive corrupts files.

Some ebay members even go to the trouble of setting up a new ebay ID to sell the fakes they bought on ebay or elsewhere – as seems to be the case with oscar1x7 – this seller’s flash drives are not faulty but fake! Do not buy “faulty” flash drives on ebay – you will be wasting your money on a piece of useless c**p! In fact, don’t buy USB flash drives on ebay at all – it’s just too risky!

If you bought a fake on ebay don’t pass the bit of c**p you bought on to some other poor buyer – go after the seller and get a refund then warn other buyers about the problem rather than selfishly contributing to it!

We advise everyone who buys flash memory items to test them with the free program h2testw irrespective of where they were purchased – otherwise you run the risk of data loss and corruption.

Report your fake if testing confirms you have purchased fake capacity flash memory on ebay.

Are UK ebay seller’s 16GB Sandisk flash drives genuine or fake?

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If this 16GB Sandisk USB flash drive (ebay item number 260560939485) listed on ebay UK by shamjeth1 is genuine then the seller is taking a big risk by listing at auction with a 99p start. Most flash memory sold at auction on ebay fetches below wholesale price so anyone selling like this risks making a loss.

Seller shamjeth1 was lucky last time he or she sold one (item number 260557243135 sold on 28th February) as it went for £18.00 so the inflated postage costs (£4.95) mean the seller would not have made a loss on that occasion. However, had the drive sold for much less, shamjeth1 would have made a loss if it was genuine. We may be wrong – but we have a lurking suspicion that this may not be a genuine Sandisk.

We advise everyone who buys flash memory items to test them with the free program h2testw irrespective of where they were purchased – otherwise you run the risk of data loss and corruption.

Report your fake if testing confirms you have purchased fake capacity flash memory on ebay.

Written by fightflashfraud

March 4, 2010 at 6:49 AM

We suspect these 8GB flash drives on ebay Australia may be fake

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A feedback comment saying that this drive did not work but the seller refunded makes us wonder if the 8GB USB flash drives sold by wowdog.9 might be fakes. Could just be that it was an isolated faulty one, we don’t know at the moment.

We strongly advise anyone who bought one of these to test it with the free program h2testw just in case.

Report your fake if testing confirms you have purchased fake capacity flash memory on ebay.

Written by fightflashfraud

February 27, 2010 at 7:03 PM

Do not buy “faulty” flash drives on ebay – they are fakes!!

Do not buy flash drives listed on ebay as “faulty” they are not faulty – they are fakes manufactured in China. These fakes are programmed by fraudsters to report a false capacity to the operating system – the real capacity is often tiny and they will corrupt your files. Sometimes they can be reprogrammed back to their real capacity but it is not worth the bother. They will never be reliable as the flash chips used in them are unstable factory rejects that could trash your files at any time even after they have been “fixed” and reprogramming correctly is not an easy job. It is also rather time consuming. No comments are permitted on this!

Written by fightflashfraud

February 21, 2010 at 1:42 PM

Are these leather clad flash drives on ebay genuine?

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hotdealsuk

We wonder whether these flash drives sold by UK powerseller hotdealsuk in 4GB and 8GB capacity are genuine. We know that these are often fake capacity as several members of the frankenflash project possess these in various fake capacities up to 32GB. We would like to hear from any buyers who have tested them with h2testw – did they pass the test or fail?

We advise everyone who buys flash memory items to test them with the free program h2testw irrespective of where they were purchased – otherwise you run the risk of data loss and corruption.

Report in to SOSFakeFlash if your testing confirms you have purchased a false capacity device on ebay.

Written by fightflashfraud

September 21, 2009 at 10:30 AM

A rather strange case with the fraudsters’ favourite flash drive

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sales-producer2

The case of sales-producer is rather unusual. This model of USB flash drive is a favourite with fraudsters in the far east for reprogramming to fake capacities. Mostly the true capacity is below 2GB, but sometimes (when they are sold as 32GB or 64GB) they have a true capacity of 4GB.

This seller advertises them as 4GB and we think this may have been their original capacity. However, a member of the frankenflash project has received two of these from sales-producer and both failed testing with h2testw.

One failed at just over 3GB and the other at just under 3GB. We wonder if this could be a result of them previously been re-programmed to fake capacities. Reprogramming of low quality flash memory can cause progressively worse failure each time the memory is programmmed to a new capacity.

We suspect this may be the case with these 4GB flash drives sold by sales-producer. In some ways this could be almost more dangerous than an outright fake as users are not likely to run into problems for months!

We strongly advise ebayers not to purchase this model of flash drive from any seller whatsoever. We have never found one of these that passed testing with h2testw. Eventually anyone using a flash memory item that fails this test will run into problems such as lost and/or corrupted files.

We advise everyone who buys flash memory items to test them with the free program h2testw irrespective of where they were purchased – otherwise you run the risk of data loss and corruption.

Report in to SOSFakeFlash if your testing confirms you have purchased a false capacity device on ebay.

Written by fightflashfraud

September 8, 2009 at 8:29 PM

Is this UK seller offering genuine flash drives or fakes?

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megan_a69

Are the 16GB USB flash drives sold by megan_a69 genuinely 16gb or are they fake capacity drives bought from one of the many fraudulent wholesalers in the far east? At the moment we don’t know. The seller claims that they are fully tested – we hope this is true. If they are genuinely 16GB then this seller is managing to supply 16GB USB flash drives cheaper than anyone else we have come across.

As usual we strongly advise ebayers to test all flash memory with the free program h2testw.

Report in to SOSFakeFlash if your testing confirms you have a false capacity device.

UPDATE 17/10/10
Seller megan_a69 has now listed 256GB Kingston DataTraveler 310 flash drives at less than half the price they are being sold at elsewhere:

Buyers can check whether or not a Kingston flash drive is genuine quite easily – here are the steps:

  1. Look at the back of the pack – is there a serial number?
  2. If there is no serial number (there should be a label showing this) then it is sure to be a fake capacity counterfeit that corrupts files – but the presence of a serial number does not, in itself, gaurantee it is genuine.

  3. Look at the USB connector – is there engraving on it giving details about the flash drive?
  4. If there is no engraving you can be sure it is a counterfeit that will trash your files – but again, the presence of engraving does not in itself gaurantee it is genuine.

  5. If both a serial number and engraving are present try verifying the serial number with Kingston.
  6. If Kingston cannot verify the serial number then you have a fake capacity counterfeit and your data will become lost or corrupted after a while.

Written by fightflashfraud

August 19, 2009 at 9:36 PM

UK seller of dodgy flash drives – beware of this item.

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nextvision4gb

UK seller nextvision-uk has a dodgy supplier and the drives sold can not be trusted. The seller claims they are tested with h2testw to give buyers confidence. An enquiry by a buyer whose drive failed the test got the response that 10% of the drives are tested.

Seller nextvision-uk asked the buyer to return the drive for a replacement. The buyer duly did so when nextvision-uk assured the buyer a tested replacement would be provided. The buyer did not get the promised working replacement, instead nextvision-uk refunded the buyer and requested a transaction cancellation.

This suggests to us that nexvision-uk could not find a reliable drive to send to the buyer. What most people do not realise is that the low grade chips used in cheap flash drives (even those that have not been fraudulently programmed) have a high failure rate. Testing is absolutely essential otherwise there is a high risk of data loss.

The flash drive our buyer got did not seem to have been fraudulently programmed. However, it failed h2testw due to bad sectors on the drive – very common with low grade chips. This would eventually lead to problems with the drive – it is likely that at some point files would begin to be lost or corrupted and there is a high risk of the drive failing altogether.

This seller previously sold own-brand flash drives which, according to a test carried out by a buyer, used low-grade 2GB chips fraudulently programmed by the supplier to show in the operating system as 8GB. The seller eventually withdrew these fakes from sale though we doubt very much that he refunded all his buyers.

You can see the original post about this seller here – it indicates some rather fishy goings-on. We wouldn’t trust this seller as far as we could throw him.

As always we strongly advise ebayers to test all flash memory with the free program h2testw.

Report in to SOSFakeFlash if your testing confirms you have a false capacity device.

Written by fightflashfraud

July 2, 2009 at 8:58 AM